Guardian Links

Thomas Aquinas was the greatest philosopher of the Christian middle ages. So what can he teach us that we have forgotten?

o                                    Thomas Aquinas, part 1: rediscovering a father of modernity

o                                    Thomas Aquinas, part 2: the mind as soul

o                                    Thomas Aquinas, part 3: scripture, reason and the being of God

o                                    Thomas Aquinas, part 4: how did the world begin?

o                                    Thomas Aquinas, part 5: what does it mean to be human?

o                                    Thomas Aquinas, part 6: natural law

o                                    Thomas Aquinas, part 7: the question of evil

o                                     Thomas Aquinas, part 8: Thomas for today

The Bible has a discomfiting tendency to cut across our natural political categories in a profoundly complex manner

o                                    The political Bible, part 1: A foundation for British attitudes

o                                    The political Bible, part 2: justice. When is a king not a king?

o                                    The political Bible, part 3: how Britain came to accept democracy

o                                    The political Bible, part 4: toleration

o                                    The political Bible, part 5: equality

o                                    The political Bible, part 6: welfare

o                                    The political Bible, part 7: nationhood

o                                    The political Bible, part 8: freedom and order

Achieving the right balance between what Jung called the ego and self is key to his theory of personality development

 

o                                    Carl Jung, part 1: Taking inner life seriously

o                                    Carl Jung, part 2: A troubled relationship with Freud – and the Nazis

o                                    Carl Jung, part 3: Encountering the unconscious

o                                    Carl Jung, part 4: Do archetypes exist?

o                                    Carl Jung, part 5: Psychological types

o                                    Carl Jung, part 6: Synchronicity

o                                    Carl Jung, part 7: The power of acceptance

o                                      Carl Jung, part 8: Religion and the search for meaning

Marx thought that to understand religion correctly would allow one to understand the hole of human history

o                                    Karl Marx, part 1: Religion, the wrong answer to the right question

o                                    Karl Marx, part 2: How Marxism came to dominate socialist thinking

o                                    Karl Marx, part 3: Men make their own history

o                                    Karl Marx, part 4: ‘Workers of the world, unite!’

o                                    Karl Marx, part 5: The problem of power

o                                    Karl Marx, part 6: The economics of power

o                                    Karl Marx, part 7: The psychology of alienation

o                                    Karl Marx, part 8: Modernity and the privatisation of hope

For this 17th century outsider, philosophy is like a spiritual practice, whose goal is happiness and liberation
 

o                                    Spinoza, part 1: Philosophy as a way of life

o                                    Spinoza, part 2: Miracles and God’s will

o                                    Spinoza, part 3: What God is not

o                                    Spinoza, part 4: All there is, is God

o                                    Spinoza, part 5: On human nature

o                                    Spinoza, part 6: Understanding the emotions

o                                    Spinoza, part 7: On the ethics of the self

o                                   Spinoza, part 8: Reading the Ethics

Genesis looks at what the culture around it believes about the nature of the material world, and disagrees with it profoundly  

o                                    The Book of Genesis, part 1: God created

o                                    The Book of Genesis, part 2: In the beginning

o                                    The Book of Genesis, part 3: Creation – and afterwards

o                                    The Book of Genesis, part 4: The problem and the answer

o                                    The Book of Genesis, part 5: Genesis and the imagination

o                                    The Book of Genesis, part 6: Patriarchs and others

o                                    The Book of Genesis, part 7: The God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob

o                                    The Book of Genesis, part 8: Why this story?

The Book of Job is the first document in history to take seriously the question of why really bad things happen to really good people

o                                    The Book of Job, part 1: Who was Job? Why does he matter?

o                                    The Book of Job, part 2: Theodicy on the street

o                                    The Book of Job, part 3: Balaam, Yithro, and Job

o                                    The Book of Job, part 4: Theodicy on ‘Planet Auschwitz’

o                                    The Book of Job, part 5: Job’s wife – did she bless or curse?

o                                    The Book of Job, part 6: Satan

o                                    The Book of Job, part 7: A life for a life?

 

For Kierkegaard, the most pressing question for each person is the meaning of his or her own existence

o                                Kierkegaard’s world, part 1: What does it mean to exist?

o                                    Kierkegaard’s world, part 2: Truth of knowledge and truth of life

o                                    Kierkegaard’s world, part 3: The story of Abraham and Isaac

o                                    Kierkegaard’s world, part 4: ‘The essentially human is passion’

o                                    Kierkegaard’s world, part 5: The task of becoming a Christian

o                                    Kierkegaard’s world, part 6: On learning to suffer

o                                    Kierkegaard’s world, part 7: Spiritlessness

o                                   Kierkegaard’s world part 8: God and possibility

Wittgenstein is a philosopher whom people find it easy to get obsessed with. What’s the secret of his attraction?

o                                    Investigating Wittgenstein, part 1: Falling in love

o                                    Investigating Wittgenstein, part 2: Meaning is use

o                                    Investigating Wittgenstein, part 3: Religion as a language game

o                                    Investigating Wittgenstein, part 4: Private language

o                                    Investigating Wittgenstein, part 5: Other selves

o                                    Investigating Wittgenstein, part 6: What see’st thou else?

o                                    Investigating Wittgenstein, part 7: Abandoning the lost battle

Plato increasingly looks not just like a generator of footnotes, but a philosopher whose time is coming again  

o                                    Plato’s Dialogues, part 1: Why Plato?

o                                    Plato’s Dialogues, part 2: Who was Plato’s Socrates?

o                                    Plato’s dialogues, part 3: Philosophy as a way of life

o                                    Plato’s Dialogues, part 4: What do you love?

o                                    Plato’s Dialogues, part 5: Love and the perception of forms

o                                    Plato’s Dialogues, part 6: The philosophical school

o                                    Plato’s Dialogues, part 7: Plato and Christianity

o                                    Plato’s Dialogues, part 8: A man for all seasons

Heidegger, the most important continental philosopher of the last century was also a Nazi. How did he get there? What can we learn from him?

o                                    Being and Time, part 1: Why Heidegger matters

o                                    Being and Time, part 2: On ‘mineness’

o                                    Being and Time, part 3: Being-in-the-world

o                                    Being and Time, part 4: Thrown into this world

o                                    Being and Time, part 5: Anxiety

o                                    Being and Time part 6: Death

o                                    Being and Time, part 7: Conscience

o                                    Being and Time, part 8: Temporality

Nietzsche thought religion in general, and Christianity in particular, was a corruption of the human spirit

o                                    On the Genealogy of Morals part 1: Meet Dr Nietzsche

o                                    On the Genealogy of Morals part 2: The slave morality

o                                    On the Genealogy of Morals, part 3: The birth of the übermensch

o                                    On the Genealogy of Morals, part 4: Is Christianity cowardly?

o                                    On the Genealogy of Morals, part 5: Breaking the cycle of conflict

o                                    On the Genealogy of Morals, part 6: Superman goes mad in solitude

o                                    On the Genealogy of Morals, part 7: Nietzsche contra dogma

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s