The many faces of Jesus from an Jungian view
East / Gnostic / History / Other Gods / Religion / Spiritual / West

The many faces of Jesus from an Jungian view


A recurring thought in books about Jesus is the thought that every time created its own Jesus. Jesus, like the virgin birth, the crucifix and resurrection, is a major symbol in the Jungian sense of the word, an abstract archetype one can fill with our own multiple meanings recognized in very culture, even non-christian. Now if we look for the many faces of Jesus, we may get access to him as a person,scholarly (theologically), from contemporary views, from other main religions, from sworn enemies of any religion and from the father of symbols – C.G. Jung.
The historical Jesus almost gets buried under his construction, even the catholic church rarely refers to him as real historic person in recent writings. Sometimes it seems that Jesus in the Gospel was also such a creation realizing the striking similarity of New Testament symbols with the Egyptian pantheon and myths. Those faces is what this article is all about. The best I have read in that regard about Jesus is from C.G. Jung, so lets start with him. Warning, this is just an essay but a rather lengthy one. Continue reading

Number, Pattern and Kabbalah Symbols – from a Jungian view
Archetypes / Astrology / C.G.Jung / East / Gnostic / Other Gods / Philosophy / Spiritual

Number, Pattern and Kabbalah Symbols – from a Jungian view


Jung has been often (rightfully) seen of being a contemporary Gnostic. However, the interpretations which Jung places on Gnosticism and the texts which Jung refers to on alchemy, were often Kabbalistic, so much so that one would be more justified in calling the Jung of the Mysterium Coniunctionis  or Kabbalistic in contemporary disguise. One of the most serious and arguably criticisms against … Continue reading

A primatologist image of God: The Ultimate Chimp
C.G.Jung / East / Ethics / History / Religion / West

A primatologist image of God: The Ultimate Chimp


Maybe it’s because I am an “unchurched”, humanist religious person, but todays anti-religious tracts and rants do bore me.  However, a new book of  the primatologist Frans de Waal, raised hope for new insights: The Bonobo and the Atheist: In Search of Humanism Among the Primates. He made accidentally an interesting point – the reciprocal imago dei (God’s imago modelled after human) of todays … Continue reading

From language games to mysticism – Allan Watts and Wittgenstein’s Tractatus
C.G.Jung / East / Philosophy / West

From language games to mysticism – Allan Watts and Wittgenstein’s Tractatus


This article explores Wittgenstein’s Tractatus as a mystical, metaphysical insight in the light of Eastern philosophy, Catholic mysticism and C. G Jung. Please be gentle and read this as an (intuitive) essay not as a scholarly article. There are methodological implications of Wittgenstein’s doctrine of silence for transcendental philosophy, Zen Buddhism, psychoanalysis and metaphysics. Or there is a line from Lao-Tse to Wittgenstein, connected … Continue reading

The Self – God’s window between pantheistic Taoism and Catholic personal god
C.G.Jung / Catholic / East / Gnostic / Philosophy / Spiritual / West

The Self – God’s window between pantheistic Taoism and Catholic personal god


Last Saturday (yesterday). I went on a retreat (religious exercise) at the Benedictine monastery St. Ottilien with twenty others men and women looking after their private center and true selves: “Looking for the self” What do we know of the psyche and soul? The discussion was lead by two monks – the longtime Prior Claudius and … Continue reading

C.G.Jung / East / Eastern / Religion

Roots of Carl Gustav Jung in Gnosticism, Christianity, Buddhism and Taoism – Draft


The relationship of the depth psychologist Carl Gustav Jung with religion, in particular Christianity, Gnosticism and Zen Buddhism is of great interest. Religion and its psychological interpretation by C.G. Jung, which is based entirely on empirical facts, is ambiguous and often rejected, or – too frequently – simply ignored. To understand Carl Gustav Jung correctly … Continue reading