Presidential debate 2012 part III : Down in the catacombs of C.G. Jung’s collective unconscious
Archetypes / Contemporary

Presidential debate 2012 part III : Down in the catacombs of C.G. Jung’s collective unconscious


Thanks to the very unassuming moderation of Mr. Schieffer,  the Monday presidential debate was civilized and pleasant. How boring. Who won? Let’s look in the catacombs of C.G. Jung’s collective unconscious. As debates has become more ritualized over the decades, journalists (particular from CNN) have begun to sound like art or sport critics. Contests are analyzed on aesthetic or numerical … Continue reading

How to write a great blog
Literature

How to write a great blog


Originally posted on Cristian Mihai:
First, I’d like to say that there is no how-to guide or recipe for writing a brilliant post. That being said, I’d also like to point out the fact that some posts seem to perform better than others. Lists and guides usually receive more comments and likes than “normal” blogs.…

Wong Kar Wai’s 2o46 – Hongkong’s Age of Aquarius?
C.G.Jung / Movies

Wong Kar Wai’s 2o46 – Hongkong’s Age of Aquarius?


2046  while still a beautiful movie, at first sight it is a bit disappointing after all the others spellbinding  subtle storylines. 2046 doesn’t come near to it for me – some part of the story is even repetitive. Visually still top-notch as ever like Wong’s earlier works with his signatures throughout: quick cutting, slow motion, fast motion, freeze frames, black … Continue reading

Phillip Jenkins book “Jesus Wars” seen from a Jungian view
Gospel / History / Medival / Religion

Phillip Jenkins book “Jesus Wars” seen from a Jungian view


Philip Jenkins is able to communicate complex ideas and complicated concepts in a manner that preserves their integrity  to a wide audience and at the same time renders them as a fascinating and lively story. I have been a fan of his books for some time.  His book “Jesus Wars” describes the historical intricacies that surrounded … Continue reading

Philip Jenkins “The Next Christendom” – in the long run . . . Christ wins out
Religion / Spiritual

Philip Jenkins “The Next Christendom” – in the long run . . . Christ wins out


Philip Jenkins has a joint appointment  at Penn State University and at Baylor University and  is also  the author of “The Lost History of Christianity”, another excellent book.  A respected professor of  history and religious studies who has been known for “going against the flow,” Jenkins argues that the rapid growth of  Christianity around the … Continue reading